On May 8th, PACK CITY COUNCIL to Demand School Funding

Philly Teachers, It’s Our Turn to Fight for Public Schools!

All over the country, teachers are in the spotlight - flooding the capital in West Virginia, sharing photos of dismal conditions in Oklahoma, walking out and shutting down twenty school districts in Kentucky. These teachers are fighting. And they’re winning-- BIG.  In Philly, we face the same problems - crumbling buildings, crowded classrooms, students with overwhelming needs, and the tired excuse that “there is no money” for our schools.

What: City Council Hearing where educators, parents, and students will PACK THE ROOM to demand funding for Philly Schools!

When & Where: May 8th, 5pm- City Council

Why:  It’s our turn! We have a plan to bring up to $300 million to the education budget - not by overtaxing working people but by demanding that corporations, developers, and big non-profits like Penn pay their fair share.

For more information on May 8th, contact contact@workingeducators.org or check out the facebook event.

Help us show City Council the conditions that Philly’s students and educators endure every day:

Submit photos and video of the conditions in your school, and we will put together a video to make it clear to City Council that our students and schools deserve better. Email photos and video to FundPhillySchools@gmail.com by Thursday, May 3rd. All educators, parents, and students are invited to submit. Click here for more info.

Download the flyer

 

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Fight for Full Funding: Submit Photos of Your School's Building Conditions

Are you tired of the excuse that “there is no money” for our schools?

On May 8th, City Council is hosting a public hearing on raising money for our city and schools- and we are going to show City Council the conditions that Philly’s students and educators endure every day!

There IS money for schools, but only if we stand together to demand it. We are inspired by the educators all over the country, who are sharing photos of dismal conditions and flooding their state capitals in West Virginia, Oklahoma, Kentucky, and Arizona. These teachers are fighting. And they’re winning­ BIG.

  

(Building condition photos from Oklahoma and Detroit)

Submit photos and video of the building and learning conditions in your school, such as crumbling books, packed classes, and unhealthy buildings (feel free to get creative!). We will put together a video for May 8th to make it clear to City Council that our students and schools deserve better! 

Email photos and video to FundPhillySchools@gmail.com by Friday, May 4th. We welcome all educators, parents, and students to submit, and anonymity will be respected if requested.

Then help us take the fight to City Council’s public hearing on May 8th- and demand the money our students and schools deserve! The Our City Our Schools coalition has a plan to bring up to $300 million to the education budget by demanding that corporations, developers, and big non­profits pay their fair share, instead of increasing property taxes for everyday Philadelphians.

Next: Join us to PACK CITY COUNCIL FOR SCHOOL FUNDING on May 8th

Learn more about the Our City Our Schools plan budget plan and the May 8th hearing at this link. If you are interested in testifying, you can email info@215pa.com.

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The SRC Voted To Dissolve. What Happens Next?

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They voted to dissolve! So when does the SRC finally go away?

Their last day is June 30. This follows the requirement that the vote must happen at least 180 days before the actual dissolution. The June 30 aligns with the fiscal year -- new school board, new budget.

What will replace the commission?

A nine-member school board appointed by the Mayor, which is what oversaw the district before the SRC came into existence in 2001. There is also a planned non-voting position for a current Philadelphia student.

How will these members be selected? 

According to the Mayor’s timeline, A nominating committee will be appointed by Mid-December. This committee will recommend 3 possible choices for each of the 9 seats on the board. The mayor will select one of these recommendations for each seat. There is also pending legislation -- which will require approval by public referendum --  that would require city council approval for all nominees.

Can anyone become a member of the school board?

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SRC’s Demise Is a Victory for Organizing

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For the first time since 2001, Philadelphia will soon control its own schools. With Mayor Kenney’s endorsement, the SRC is almost certain to vote for its own abolition, ending the failed experiment that put Harrisburg in control of the Philadelphia School District.

The return of local control is a victory for Philadelphia’s students, parents, teachers, and community members. It is a victory for those who have spent years attending SRC meetings to protest and testify for more accountable school governance. It is a victory for Mayor Kenney, for recognizing the danger that state control poses to the future of our school district, and it is a victory for the members of the SRC for recognizing that the students of Philadelphia are best served by their willingness to step aside.

It is a victory that would not have happened without strong, grassroots organizing.

After more than 15 years, why have the Mayor and SRC chosen this moment to dissolve? The Mayor has spent the last year refusing to commit to a particular timeline. As recently as a few weeks ago, he said that he expected a vote on SRC abolition to happen “sometime in 2018.” Meanwhile, members of City Council and the Mayor’s staff had told us in recent months that there was little movement towards SRC dissolution, and little likelihood this would change without outside pressure. So what changed?

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