Educators Fight Back Against Teacher Bullying

At the School Board Meeting this Thursday, WE members took a stand against top down policies that interfere with educator autonomy and the retaliation that takes place when they questions these unreasonable policies. 

When educators in one area of the city started receiving demands to complete overly extensive and uncontractual lesson plans and reports, they worked together to ask questions and fight back. They wrote a public letter signed by over 150 educators from more than 10 different schools. They set up meetings with administrators. And when one of the educators was bullied by an administrator with unfair retaliation, they spoke out about these issues at the school board.

Instead of giving in to these fear tactics, their testimony was so well received by the board that Dr. Hite immediately approached them and asked to speak further on the matter.  He stated to the room that, "this is policing and it will end now!".  Additionally, a few board members along with Dr. Hite asked follow up questions to testimonies, asking about the extent of administration retaliation and to be put in touch with the specific teachers mentioned. Dr. Hite was observed a few times shaking his head in disgust, hearing about the unnecessary obstacles we are facing. 

When we work together to fight for our schools and students, we can overcome fear and win! Watch their testimony below, along with the community letter.

Read more about other victories against new charter schools and criminalization of students from the February School Board Meeting here.

(Photo: Victorious educators from the affected network after the school board meeting!)

 

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Students and Educators Are Fighting Back - And Winning

On Thursday night, PFT members and leaders in the Caucus of Working Educators were fighting for our students and schools at the February meeting of the Board of Education.  For several years, Caucus members in coalition with Our City Our Schools, organized to abolish the School Reform Commission and fight for local control. Last night’s testimonies from WE members took place alongside students and community members across multiple campaigns that are fighting for the schools Philly deserves.  The presence of this school board and ways that we continue to collectively hold the district accountable are a continued testament to the work, leadership, and local power of students, families, and rank and file educators.

Kait McCann, Jessica Way, and Honey Polis-Bodine testified against increased busy work, top-down lesson plan policies that interfere with educator autonomy, and retaliation against PFT members who are pushing back.  Board members asked follow up questions to testimonies and wanted to know what the extent of district-level administrative retaliation includes and to be put in touch with the specific teachers mentioned in their statements.  Hite named publicly that this policing of PFT members and must end immediately. Read the open letter, read Kait McCann’s testimony, and watch videos from the video here.

These testimonies connected increased teacher bullying to increased attrition in our district.  Proposed language in Policy 111, to be voted on by the Board in March, did NOT reflect the PFT contract.  PFT members have been organizing against these top down policies all year, including circulating an open letter signed by 150 PFT members.  When rank and file educators organize collectively, we can debunk fear and fight back.

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Heal Our Schools: Community Meeting to End Toxic School Conditions

On Monday, December 10 from 4:30 - 6:30, the Caucus of Working Educators is hosting a community meeting to end toxic school conditions. 

As we have moved through this school year, it has become abundantly clear that our schools are shells of the learning institutions they could be. Our students deal with trauma in their neighborhoods and are then asked to sit in classrooms that further their distress. Many of our buildings are uninhabitable, from the lead, asbestos, and the crumbling, leaky ceilings to a lack of heating, cooling, and ventilation. In the neighborhoods, the gun violence and housing instability make the day to day lives our students even more treacherous; Philadelphia’s children are being asked to do too much! Collectively, teachers and parents have to demand better for our kids. 

But there are steps we can take to get what schools need. Ending the 10-year tax abatements, demanding an increase in social workers and counselors in schools, and pushing for an eradication of lead and asbestos in ALL schools can be accomplished if we work in unison. We want to bring together people in the city who are ready to take action. 

On Monday December 10th, join us from 4:30-6:30pm at The U School (2000 N. 7th street). The school is easily accessible via bus 3, 47, regional rail and the BSL. There will be speakers, snacks, and real ways to get involved. Click here to RSVP and share on social media.

Childcare will be provided.

Email us at contact@workingeducators.org with any questions.

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Parents Speak Out From "The Most Toxic School In Philadelphia"

As an elementary school crossing guard, Kenya Cannon takes children’s safety very seriously. Everyday, she shepherds students across her intersection and into Cassidy Elementary School, where they should be safe. But over the past year, Kenya has learned that Cassidy Elementary School is not a safe place for students or adults.

Last spring, the Philadelphia Inquirer revealed that Cassidy is “perhaps the most toxic school in the Philadelphia system,” with elevated levels of lead, asbestos, and other asthma triggers. The report helped her make sense of the serious asthma attacks her son had been suffering, and she decided to transfer him to a different school with a safer building. His condition has improved considerably since starting at the new school.

But Kenya continues to worry about the hundreds of children who cross the street and enter Cassidy each day. How is the lead dust and asbestos affecting their short-term and long-term health? Why isn’t the School District taking action to protect students’ safety?

Determined to speak out on behalf of the children in her charge, Kenya signed up to testify at the November Board of Education action meeting. During the first snowstorm of the season last Thursday, she braved the snow and ice and spent two hours battling traffic in order to appear at the meeting. Arriving just after 6pm, she found that the meeting had ended early due to the weather, and she had lost her chance to speak before the Board. Here is what she planned to say:

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WE've Been Making Bold Moves. Join Us!

by Kathleen Melville and Tasaday Messina

WE have been making some bold moves lately - shutting down a City Council hearing to call attention to dangerous conditions in our schools, protesting the “phase-out” of Strawberry Mansion, and demanding that the rich pay their fair share to fund Philly schools. We do this because our students deserve much better than crumbling buildings and understaffed schools. And we do this because it works.

This past week, in response to growing pressure from Philly education advocates, Governor Wolf announced an additional $15 million to repair Philly schools. He also called for a major change in state education funding that would increase equity and bring more money to urban districts like Philadelphia.

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On May 8th, PACK CITY COUNCIL to Demand School Funding

Philly Teachers, It’s Our Turn to Fight for Public Schools!

All over the country, teachers are in the spotlight - flooding the capital in West Virginia, sharing photos of dismal conditions in Oklahoma, walking out and shutting down twenty school districts in Kentucky. These teachers are fighting. And they’re winning-- BIG.  In Philly, we face the same problems - crumbling buildings, crowded classrooms, students with overwhelming needs, and the tired excuse that “there is no money” for our schools.

What: City Council Hearing where educators, parents, and students will PACK THE ROOM to demand funding for Philly Schools!

When & Where: May 8th, 5pm- City Council

Why:  It’s our turn! We have a plan to bring up to $300 million to the education budget - not by overtaxing working people but by demanding that corporations, developers, and big non-profits like Penn pay their fair share.

For more information on May 8th, contact contact@workingeducators.org or check out the facebook event.

Help us show City Council the conditions that Philly’s students and educators endure every day:

Submit photos and video of the conditions in your school, and we will put together a video to make it clear to City Council that our students and schools deserve better. Email photos and video to FundPhillySchools@gmail.com by Thursday, May 3rd. All educators, parents, and students are invited to submit. Click here for more info.

Download the flyer

 

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Fight for Full Funding: Submit Photos of Your School's Building Conditions

Are you tired of the excuse that “there is no money” for our schools?

On May 8th, City Council is hosting a public hearing on raising money for our city and schools- and we are going to show City Council the conditions that Philly’s students and educators endure every day!

There IS money for schools, but only if we stand together to demand it. We are inspired by the educators all over the country, who are sharing photos of dismal conditions and flooding their state capitals in West Virginia, Oklahoma, Kentucky, and Arizona. These teachers are fighting. And they’re winning­ BIG.

  

(Building condition photos from Oklahoma and Detroit)

Submit photos and video of the building and learning conditions in your school, such as crumbling books, packed classes, and unhealthy buildings (feel free to get creative!). We will put together a video for May 8th to make it clear to City Council that our students and schools deserve better! 

Email photos and video to FundPhillySchools@gmail.com by Friday, May 4th. We welcome all educators, parents, and students to submit, and anonymity will be respected if requested.

Then help us take the fight to City Council’s public hearing on May 8th- and demand the money our students and schools deserve! The Our City Our Schools coalition has a plan to bring up to $300 million to the education budget by demanding that corporations, developers, and big non­profits pay their fair share, instead of increasing property taxes for everyday Philadelphians.

Next: Join us to PACK CITY COUNCIL FOR SCHOOL FUNDING on May 8th

Learn more about the Our City Our Schools plan budget plan and the May 8th hearing at this link. If you are interested in testifying, you can email info@215pa.com.

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